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Victory for Immigrant Drivers in North Carolina

Orange County Justice United in North Carolina won an agreement from District Attorney James Woodall that has the potential to save Latino drivers tens of thousands of dollars a year in court fines and fees.

A year-long issue campaign culminated in a 600 person action on March 28, 2017 where the District Attorney publicly committed to a deferral program for unlicensed yet otherwise safe drivers. The program will assist Latino drivers in Orange and Chatham County who have paid roughly $1.3 million in citations after a change in state policy in 2006 rendered them ineligible to apply for or renew their licenses without a social security number.

More information here:  http://www.ocjusticeunited.org/campaign_victory

BUILD: CUPs Coffeehouse Grand Opening in East Baltimore

CUPs (Creating Unlimited Possibilities) Coffeehouse, the first of its kind in the East Baltimore community of Oliver, held its grand opening in the Oliver community. BUILD organized with its community development entity, Development Partners, to recruit CUPS and finance and redevelop the building. CUPS trains and mentors youth to help them gain technical and social skills for working in the restaurant and hospitality industry and provides leadership skills through opportunities to plan, organize, and implement Community Engagement Projects. Twenty positions in culinary training will go to Turnaround Tuesday participants.

He cleaned Nick Clegg's office – and was punished for wanting a living wage

Every weekday Valdemar Ventura, a gentle man with impeccable manners, leaves his small flat in south London and, until July, made his way to Downing Street and the Cabinet Office, where his duties included cleaning the floors, lavatories and office of the deputy prime minister,Nick Clegg. "A good man," Ventura says. "He always said, 'Hello, good morning'." Acknowledgment matters to a workforce often rendered largely invisible.

The Olympic Games Help Londoners

Britain last hosted the summer Olympics in 1948, just after World War II when we were broke and our aspirations were low. The Stadium was dominated by a quote from the founder of the modern Olympics, Baron Pierre de Coubertin: “The important thing in the Olympic Games is not winning but taking part. The essential thing in life is not conquering but fighting well.” This time around, Londoners can do more than take part: we can win.

Before Games, Workers Win a Big Event

LONDON — Enveloped in a warm, glimmering haze, the Olympic Stadium looks like a vast, silvery spaceship come to unlikely rest in the working-class East End.  Our viewing platform is no less unlikely. I’m standing with Lina Jamoul, a community organizer, at the top of a giant new shopping mall. It feels as though someone in Santa Monica should file a claim for grand-theft mall.

Community organisers help 1,200 people into Olympic jobs

Lina Jamoul from London Citizens argues that Work Programme contractors could learn lessons from London Citizens’ success in helping east Londoners to find jobs at the 2012 games.

In Gilded City, Living Wage Proposal Still Stirs Fears

In 1996, the Industrial Areas Foundation, an organizing group that has built thousands of homes across New York City, proposed that private firms contracting with the city pay food service workers, security guards, cleaners and temporary office workers a wage that ranged at the time from $7.25 to $12 an hour. “We started with a pretty simple idea: If you work full time, you shouldn’t be poor,” recalled Jonathan Lange, an organizer with Metro I.A.F., the local affiliate.

Living Wage, Again

Amid the uproar during the past few weeks over the proposed living wage law there’s one important point that you might have missed: the city already has a living-wage law. Its rules cover thousands of workers employed under more than $1 billion worth of contracts with the city.  In fact, New York City had one of the first living-wage laws in the country, though the city’s first bill covered just a couple thousand workers.

TELCO delivers commitments for a Living Wage Olympics in London 2012

London 2012 from its inception has been an organising opportunity for TELCO, and the work continues. Over 700 people gathered at an Assembly in November 2010 to focus on the Olympics. We negotiated publicly with officials from all three Olympic Games agencies (the Delivery Authority, the Organising Committee, and the Legacy Company). A month after our action, LOCOG (the Organising Committee for the Games) announced that all 130,000 jobs during the Games will be paid at least a London Living Wage. During April, TELCO schools took advantage of the International Olympic Committee visiting London and organised a celebration rally of the Ethical Guarantees that were struck between TELCO and the Olympic agencies. Over 300 students from East London schools attended the celebration rally; gave ‘Civil Society’ awards to the Chief Executives of the Olympic agencies; reminded them of their commitments to the organised people of East London and asked LOCOG to work with TELCO to ensure that local people are given job opportunities during the Games. We have since held two successful pilot jobs fayres, spearheaded by St Thomas More in North Hackney and St Katherine’s in Bow. In September, the TELCO team plans to roll out ten jobs fairs, clustered around anchor institutions.

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