Close

Not a member yet?Register now and get started.

lock and key

Sign in to your account.

Account Login

New York Times

His Father’s Murder Drives a Rabbi’s Pursuit of Gun Control

In the months after his father’s murder in early 1999, those months stretching formlessly between the mourning ritual of shiva and the impending trial of a suspect, Rabbi Joel Mosbacher received many messages of solace. There was one type, however, that tested every atom of clerical forbearance he possessed“People said in this trying

Muslim Cultural Center Appears Near Approval

A long battle over a proposed mosque in DuPage County is approaching a turning point, and although anti-Muslim sentiment and resistance to mosques in the Chicago area are hardly going away, Muslims appear to be winning this time.

In Gilded City, Living Wage Proposal Still Stirs Fears

In 1996, the Industrial Areas Foundation, an organizing group that has built thousands of homes across New York City, proposed that private firms contracting with the city pay food service workers, security guards, cleaners and temporary office workers a wage that ranged at the time from $7.25 to $12 an hour. “We started with a pretty simple idea: If you work full time, you shouldn’t be poor,” recalled Jonathan Lange, an organizer with Metro I.A.F., the local affiliate.

Coming Together to Pray, and Also to Find Reduced-Rate Energy Deals

WASHINGTON — Like manna from heaven, thousands of dollars in new revenue is raining on a group of congregations here from the unlikeliest of sources: the utility bill.

Home Is Where the Mold Is

Sarita Latchman, a vibrant 42-year-old mother and former parks worker, has a sound like a baby’s rattle at the back of her throat. Which is not surprising, as her apartment in the Jefferson Houses in East Harlem is speckled with soot-black mold. A thick carpet of it runs down her bathroom wall and across the ceiling of her children’s bedrooms. Rub it and the spores float, landing on sink tops and children’s hair. They also journey through Ms. Latchman’s nasal passageway into her lungs...

After Council Balks, Bronx Schools Project Is Withdrawn

It is the single biggest project in the biggest school construction plan in the history of New York City: a $235 million campus of four schools, with a football field and basketball courts, to be built on old railyards in the South Bronx. Local groups that pushed for the plan cheered wildly when Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg endorsed it two years ago.

Nurturing small schools without hurting big ones

VIRGINIA GONZALEZ marched through the dismal drizzle of a late November morning in the South Bronx. She made her way past the bodegas, video stores and housing projects of Mott Haven, crossed over a tangle of railroad tracks, and descended into several acres of urban underbrush. Weeds stood shoulder-high. Chunks of concrete and drainpipe lay in heaps. A car chassis rusted beside chain-link fence.
    
"The promised land," Ms. Gonzalez announced to several companions, and she spoke with not a trace of irony...

New deal reached on chromium cleanup at Jersey City Site

JERSEY CITY — Some 25 years ago, Ellen Wright was driving home through her neighborhood of single-family wood-frame houses here when she noticed that the streets were slick with “green water.”

“It was a terrible thing,” said Mrs. Wright, now 77, recalling her unease.

Pages