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Washington Post

WIN Calls for Policy Changes at Shelter

The rally was sponsored by the Washington Interfaith Network, a congregation-based community organizing group. Members of the organization said they had been visiting residents at the shelter in the past six weeks, and have been stunned by their stories.

On Tuesday, residents spoke of power outages and uncooked meat served in the cafeteria. One held up a sign saying, “No rats, no roaches.” “I have been sick and my daughter has been sick,” said Bre Archie, 35, who has lived in the shelter for 16 months. “This is no place for children,” she added. “Its stressful for adults.”

Counting begins to force referendum on immigrant tuition law

Opponents of a new Maryland law to give undocumented immigrants in-state college tuition breaks said they turned in more than twice as many signatures as needed on Thursday night to suspend the law and to force it to a statewide referendum. The Maryland State Board of Elections now has until July 22 to certify the signatures, but it is likely the opponents will know before then whether they have succeeded. Elections officials plan to begin daily updates on the board’s Web site with the tally as it progresses...

Using Threats, N.Y. Landlords Feed Immigrants' Fear

NEW YORK -- They sat there, three diminutive and worried Mexican women, in the shadows in the back pews of St. Jerome's Church in the Bronx. Father John O. Grange noticed and motioned them forward.

The women handed Grange a letter. They had asked for apartment repairs, and this letter contained what appeared to be the landlord's response.

Marielys Divanne, left, of South Bronx Churches works on behalf of tenants such as Sandra and Manuela, right. (Helayne Seidman For The Washington Post)

A message to Fenty and Gray: It's All About Jobs

For several months, the focus of the District's mayoral campaign, and much of the media coverage of it, has been on the contrasting personal styles of the front-runners, Mayor Adrian M. Fenty and D.C. Council Chairman Vincent C. Gray. We in the Washington Interfaith Network (WIN) think it's time for the campaign and the candidates to focus on the issues instead. As an organization, WIN does not endorse candidates, but we do our best to hold those who run for office accountable to the people on the issues that affect their lives.

Candidates vow to fight high-interest lending

The major candidates for mayor and D.C. Council chairman promised Monday night that they would push to remove city money from any bank that charges more than 10 percent interest on consumer loans.

Democratic mayoral candidates Adrian M. Fenty and Vincent Gray and chairman candidates Kwame Brown and Vincent Orange made the pledge to the Washington Interfaith Network as part of the group's 2010 election agenda.

Putting Faith in Affordable Housing

Nearly three decades after Washington area faith leaders founded a movement for affordable housing, there is a new push -- particularly in the District -- to revive the effort and get the clergy to see housing as an urgent mission field.

Bland residents, city officials reach accord

Current and former James Bland housing residents thanked the Alexandria City Council and the city's housing authority for resolving their relocation issues after a year of protests and meetings.

The residents, along with Virginians Organized for Interfaith Community Engagement, or VOICE, stood before the council at its meeting Saturday and declared a victory for the 180 residents of the 8.5-acre public housing community in the Braddock East area, which is being developed into a $55 million mixed-use property with market-rate and affordable homes...

No home for the holidays

Martha Holmes's small, frail body often bumps into things in her new apartment, which seems like a maze to the 87-year-old woman with Alzheimer's disease. In the last month, she has been hospitalized twice, and police have found her wandering the streets, attempting to walk back to the public housing apartment in Alexandria that she called home for more than 40 years.

Legislation gives mobile-home owners protection if land is sold

For years, Amy Lamke's answer to her affordable housing dilemma was bouncing with her daughter, Katlin, from one place to another, sharing space with strangers whom she met through classified ads.

But when she discovered Deep Run, a community of mobile homes tucked away off a two-lane road near Route 1 in Elkridge, in Howard County, Lamke figured she had found the stability she and her daughter had longed for...

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