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Immigration

800 gather at church to support Md. Dream Act

Even though 800 people had gathered in a house of the Lord, the bishop made a request that usually would be out of line.  “This is going to be the one time in church you’ll be glad to have your cellphone,” Bishop Douglas Miles said as he encouraged members of the crowd to keep their cellphones on, although the reason why was not immediately clear.  The meeting at the Southern Asian Seventh-day Adventist Church in Silver Spring was as political as it was spiritual.

Congregations work to pass the Dream Act

Eight hundred people joined in prayer in a church in Silver Spring on Tuesday night, praying for the Dream Act. Many were leaders of churches and synagogues, all pledging to encourage their congregations, neighbors and friends to vote for Question 4. Possibly the most active part of a coalition that spans labor unions, the education community and a number of elected officials including Gov. Martin O’Malley, faith communities in Maryland have almost unanimously campaigned in favor of the law, which passed in 2011 and was brought to referendum by petition.

In Maryland, an immigration battle redux

A new law allowing in-state college tuition for some illegal immigrants is suspended until it can go before voters next year. In the meantime, both sides build up huge campaigns to persuade the public.

Maryland tuition law must be defended

Regarding the recent article about the lawsuit over the Maryland Dream Act ("Vote on tuition bill faces lawsuit," Aug.

Counting begins to force referendum on immigrant tuition law

Opponents of a new Maryland law to give undocumented immigrants in-state college tuition breaks said they turned in more than twice as many signatures as needed on Thursday night to suspend the law and to force it to a statewide referendum. The Maryland State Board of Elections now has until July 22 to certify the signatures, but it is likely the opponents will know before then whether they have succeeded. Elections officials plan to begin daily updates on the board’s Web site with the tally as it progresses...

House approves in-state tuition for illegal immigrants

The House of Delegates voted Friday to extend in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants — the highest hurdle so far for a plan that has already passed the Senate and has the backing of Gov. Martin O'Malley. Undocumented students cheered the 74-66 vote and embraced supportive lawmakers as they streamed out of the House chamber after hours of spirited debate...

Clergyman says immigration key to growth

Urging minority groups to unite and assert their influence on policy makers in Massachusetts and across the country, the head of a prominent interfaith group quoted Scripture and drew cheers at a State House rally yesterday.

“When William Bradford and the Mayflower pilgrims arrived at Plymouth Rock in 1620, they did not bring any immigration papers,’’ said the Rev. Hurmon Hamilton, president of the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization. “When John Winthrop arrived in 1630 with the next wave of New Englanders … they were not met with a wall built to keep them out...

Immigrant in-state tuition bill moves forward

ANNAPOLIS — A panel of Maryland senators is hoping a series of nighttime tweaks will help shepherd a plan to grant in-state tuition to illegal immigrants through the Senate.

The Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee voted Tuesday night to clean up the plan to grant illegal immigrants the same tuition rates at state-run universities that Maryland residents pay...

Senate to take up tuition break for undocumented students

Legislation would start students at community college

The state Senate is poised this week to take up a controversial plan to offer discounted tuition at Maryland's public colleges and universities to students who are in the country illegally.

The legislation, which cleared the Senate education committee last week, would allow undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at any of Maryland's public community colleges. After completing two years of study, they could transfer to a four-year institution and continue to pay the in-state rate...

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